Wednesday, August 3, 2016

#IWSG for August 2016



The Insecure Writer's Support Group (IWSG) is the brilliant idea of Alex J. Cavanaugh. The purpose of the group is to share doubts and insecurities and to encourage one another. Please visit the other participants and share your support. A kind word goes a long way.

The awesome co-hosts for this month's IWSG are: Tamara Narayan, Tonja Drecker, Ellen @ The Cynical Sailor, Lauren @ Pensuasion, Stephen Tremp, and Julie Flanders!

This month's question: What was your very first piece of writing as an aspiring writer? Where is it now? Collecting dust or has it been published?

I was writing since I could make sentences. I still have a poem about the moon I wrote when I was five which won a ribbon in my town's fall festival. I have the binders of short stories I wrote about the neighborhood kids from when I was eight through my teen years.

The first short story I tried to get published was rejected, and I threw it away. I was eighteen, and I had very thin skin. I remember it was about a college aged psychopath killing the boys who didn't love her back, and who really didn't know she existed at all. That rejection kept me from letting anyone else see my writing for over twelve years.

I did keep writing, though. When I finally started submitting stories to venues again, more rejections came my way, but I was older and wiser more stubborn. I kept putting myself out there until a little drabble about alien pet care was accepted. My first acceptance. And I made a dollar from it! I would have been ecstatic without the dollar, but I keep it in a frame on my desk to remind me to never give up.

26 comments:

  1. So glad you ultimately didn't quit, since your writing is fab. Love how you keep the first dollar you ever earned from a story framed!

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  2. Hi Christine - I'm sure your story is like many others ... I don't remember writing stories as a kid ... but so great you persevered ... good luck now - with more publications ... cheers Hilary

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  3. Love this - "older and wiser and more stubborn."

    And I think the story from when you were 18 sounds like it could be some kind of YA/NA horror revenge novel. :)

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  4. It does take being stubborn. Cool you framed that dollar.

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  5. What a sweet post of success! I love your strong drive and determination to plow ahead. :)

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  6. "Never give up." Words to live by, especially if you're a writer. I'm glad you became more stubborn.

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  7. That's a great story! I'm glad you went back to writing despite being downhearted about the rejection.

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  8. More stubborn for sure. That's the only way any of us get there, eh? I'm glad you kept fighting. This is definitely your calling in life.

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  9. Yes, we do have to be stubborn or maybe even a bit sado-masochistic. At any rate, you've been writing too long to give up now!

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  10. You've been winning awards for quite a while! Keep up the good work.

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  11. Being stubborn certainly helps when it comes to being a writer.

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  12. I'm glad you kept writing. Writers need to be stubborn. :)

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  13. Writers have to be stubborn, don't we? My first payment as a writer came as a check (for $5), but I didn't want to mess up the sender's ability to balance their books, so I deposited it.

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  14. Impressive, you went from padawan to Jedi writer starting at age five. They got you young. That is very cool. And you even won something. Yup, impressive.

    Juneta @ Writer's Gambit

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  15. Right On! That is what I am working toward. My first acceptance of one of my short stories. Thanks for the encouragement.
    Shalom aleichem,
    Patricia

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  16. That's so sad that that rejection prevented you from writing for over 12 years, but I am SO glad that you did start writing again. You are one of my favorite authors. :)

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  17. That story your wrote in college sounds so creepy and really good! Sorry it ended up causing you so much disappointment. But glad you got back to writing as you have more great stories than I can count. :)

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  18. You're so lucky you still have most of those old stories. My mother threw out almost all of the picture books and novelette- and novella-length stories I wrote when we left New York in 1996. She put them out with the recyclables, convinced there wasn't room for that one box in the moving truck.

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  19. Good for you, Christine. Determination and stubborness are attributes in a writer :) Have a super month!

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  20. I think we do get more stubborn as we get older, LOL. I'm glad you're still writing, Christine. You're an inspiration! (((hugs)))

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  21. Stubbornness and perseverance go hand in hand. So does developing a thick skin. Glad you kept going. Best wishes.

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  22. Thank you all! I'm happy I could provide inspiration, and I'm glad I'm not the only stubborn one around here. :)

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  23. It's funny, but there's a magical line you cross over which you can take the rejection. I got a few and gave up, and it was over a decade before I tried again after that, too. And now the rejections roll off my back (for the most part.)

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  24. I'm so glad you grew thicker skin and kept at the writing thing. I'm still a little thin skinned, but I am also stubborn.

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  25. I'd love to read that poem you wrote as a five year old...how cute!!
    Way to go with developing a thick skin! You're such a great author!

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